Banner - Halifax Index - aGREATERhalifax

Transportation

USE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

Overall use of public transportation grew significantly between 2011-12 and 2012-13; however the biggest reason for this was the month- long Metro Transit strike which dampened the 2011-12 totals. Looking back further, ridership grew 1.1% from 2010-11 despite a 4.7% increase in the number of hours of service on the road. Looking even further back to 2007-08, despite an increase in service hours of 18.7%, ridership has only grown 2.8%. 

Growth in hours of service in 2012-13 was the result of the new MetroX Route to the Airport/Fall River, as well as the creation of a high-frequency corridor on Portland Street, along with several other smaller routing and schedule adjustments. 

PUBLIC TRANSIT SATISFACTION

   

RIDER SATISFACTION WITH PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Source: HRM Citizen Survey, Intercept Survey

 RIDER_SATISFACTION_GRAPH-01
Another reason for the lack of growth in ridership may be found in rider satisfaction survey. Between 2010 and 2012, rider satisfaction dropped 16.4% to 60.6% in 2012. The slow long-term growth suggests that more in-depth knowledge of what it would take to significantly boost ridership is necessary.  

Overall satisfaction with transportation among the business community remains fair. Most businesses surveyed show some level of satisfaction with the public transportation system and the local road and street network. However, among municipal services listed in the Partnership’s semi-annual business confidence survey, transit is consistently the lowest ranked municipal service by businesses. 

The Partnership’s SmartBusiness data shows that many issues surrounding transit are focused on the availability and quality of infrastructure and buses, particularly in outlying areas of the municipality, and in particular, Burnside Industrial Park. 

MODE OF TRANSPORTATION TO WORK AND MEDIAN COMMUTING DISTANCE

Halifax had the highest proportion of its population that took public transit to work in 2006 among its benchmark cities. With nearly 12% of the population taking public transit, Halifax is a full percentage point above the national average. 

Halifax also had the second-highest proportion of the population who walked or biked to work. Over 11% of the population walked or bicycled, nearly 3.5% above the Canadian average. 

Furthermore, the median commuting distance in Halifax was 6.5 km, 1.1 km below the national average but the second highest among benchmark cities, increasing slightly between 2001 and 2006. 

Unfortunately, cuts to Statistics Canada’s census make it challenging to continue tracking these statistics against other jurisdictions. As such, data availability on how people get to work may not line up in the future with these existing statistics. 

Ensuring resident and businesses’ public transportation needs are met – and understanding why satisfaction is low – is important to the long-term sustainability of the city. As the city grows, public transportation will be a vital link for many residents to jobs and services within the community. 


TRANSIT PASSENGER VOLUME & HOURS OF SERVICE, HALIFAX
Source: HRM - Metro Transit

TRANSIT_GRAPH1-01