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Sectors

EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR

Halifax’s goods-producing sectors regressed in 2012, losing 900 jobs from 2011 levels.  Their  comparative level of growth since 2000 sits fourth among benchmark cities. Conversely, Halifax’s services sector saw growth of nearly 2,700 jobs and has grown each year since 2000. The proportional growth of Halifax’s services sector is tied with three other cities for second place among the benchmark cities. 

In part due to declining budgets and cutbacks at the federal level and provincial government jobs moving from Halifax to other regions of Nova Scotia, the public administration and health care sectors saw a decline of employment in 2012 from 50,300 to 49,700.  Breaking it down, health care actually saw positive growth (1,500) while public administration saw significant declines (2,100). All other sectors collectively added 2,400 jobs in 2012. The health care and public administration sector growth since 2000 in Halifax was second among benchmark cities, while growth in all other sectors was second lowest among those cities. 

Breaking down other sectors, results were mixed in 2012. Gains were largest in transportation and warehousing (1,700 jobs); professional, technical and scientific services (1,500); educational services (1,400); and other services (2,900). By far, the sector losing the most employment was trade (-5,200 jobs), construction (-1,000), and manufacturing (-900.)

In terms of wage growth, overall average hourly wages increased by 3.7% in 2012. Increases were particularly fruitful in primary industries (9.1%), management (7.6%), and processing and manufacturing (7%). The arts, culture, recreation and sport sector was the only one with declining wages (-4.0%) and lagged $1.72 behind the overall average hourly wage in 2012.

Looking at occupational projections through the Canadian Occupational Projection System for Nova Scotia, future employment is expected primarily in five broad skill types: sales and service; health occupations; trades, transportation, and equipment operators; natural and applied sciences; and business, finance, and administration. These sectors are primarily service based indicating that Halifax will continue to develop as a service hub. With that said, projects like those at the Halifax Shipyard and in offshore oil and gas may bring manufacturing and construction jobs to the region, boosting the goods and services sectors. 

Of concern to Halifax’s stability are continued cuts to federal and provincial job totals in Halifax. While Halifax has a lower proportion of public sector and health care jobs (not including the Canadian Forces) than other benchmark cities, federal government job levels could drop to their lowest in recent memory, and cuts to the Canadian Forces are reported as well. Unfortunately, Statistics Canada has stopped tracking federal government jobs by census metropolitan area, so it will be difficult to determine the exact impact on Halifax.

EMPLOYMENT_BY_SECTOR_HFX

 

EMPLOYMENT IN GOODS AND SERVICE SECTORS, 

000s, HAILFAX

Source: Statistics Canada
 SECTOR_GRAPH1-01

 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE EMPLOYMENT AND PRIVATE SECTOR EMPLOYMENT, BENCHMARK, CMAs

Source: Statistics Canada

SECTOR_PUBLICADMIN_GRAPH-01

PARTNERS

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